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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
it must raise the debt ceiling and that the fed is going to keep buying bonds for now. on this one-month anniversary of the heinous, awful newtown shootings, the sheriff comes out in favor of banning assault weapons. "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up tonight, president obama slams the republicans. he says no gimmick, no magic coins. just the plain old standoff on the debt ceiling. who is gonna blink first in this? john harwood joins us from washington with the details. good evening. >> good evening. the president used the last news conference of first term to draw an ever-brighter line with congressional republicans on the debt ceiling. they say they want dollar for dollar spending cuts to be matched with an increase in the debt ceiling. the president said i'll negotiate with you, but not over the debt ceiling. he simply is not going to allieu republicans to take the full faith and credit of the united states and the health of the u.s. economy as hostages. >> they will not collect our ransom in exchange for crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of
the u.s. economy and the fed's role in monetary policy. he called on congress to raise the debt ceiling in the release of u.s. can pay its bills. he spoke at the gerald ford school of public policy. >> thank you very much. it is also my great pleasure to welcome all of you here today. on behalf of the gerald r. ford school of public policy, the university of michigan is extremely honored to welcome the hon. ben bernanke, chairman of the board of governors of the federal reserve system. today's conversation is the latest in our series of distinguished lectures, policy talks at the fort school. we're so pleased that region white can introduce to the events and we're also very president marye sue: here today as well as -- we also have several of the university's executive officers and beans. i would like to welcome all of them and thank them for joining us today. it is an honor and truly personal pleasure to introduce our next guest. the fed's charges to provide a healthy economy. this is a complex and critically important mission and it makes the person at its helm one of if not the most
: the dow is trying to turn positive. cheryl, i do not think we go anywhere until we fix this debt ceiling fight. cheryl: they are coming up with at least a recommendation. i am sure there will be an argument in d.c. ashley and melissa have got you covered. ashley: another argument in d.c., never? melissa: shocking. [ laughter ] we do have breaking news. learning a vote on the debt ceiling coming as early as next week. the details of the bill and reaction from peter welch straight ahead. ashley: one american remains missing in the u.s. says they will not go she ate hostage swap with terrorists. stephen hadley is our special guest this hour. ashley: energy companies facing off against a formidable opponent. they are losing. ashley: do not mess with the chicken. that is all i will say. especially with the prairie chicken. time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. nicole petallides. nicole: we are not to far off the unchanged line. you sneeze and you are in the positive territory. intel has been weighing on the dow jones industrials. that has been one of the things holding them back. the
. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 >> $64 trillion and counting. the nation's debt ceiling. to cut to red, my next guest advocates more green when it comes to health care. the called the health reduction. she said there would be a method. explain. >> well, actually, the public option would decrease the deficit by about $104 billion over ten years. >> how too you know that? >> that's the congressional budget office estimate. of what it would do. this is not numbers i made up. because it would inn fact lower the -- provide an option -- this would be completely by choice -- for people who don't want to pick this public option, among the private sector choices within a health exchange, and rates for premiums are estimated to be about 5 to 7% lower, meaning those people in the exchange that needed a subsidy would take fewer tax dollars and it is also estimated that it would serve as an anchor, because there's competition, to bring down the cost of health care, even in the private sector as well. >> when is the government -- when is the government ever done that? with george bush's plan, you were critic
the debt ceiling, or exercise the responsibility that they have kept for themselves and raise the debt ceiling, because this is about paying the bills. this is not a complicated concept. you do not go out to dinner and then eat all you want and then leave without paying the check. if you do, you are breaking the law. congress should think about the same way the american people do. if congress wants to say maybe we should go to a more modest restaurant, that's fine. in order to curb our appetite, we're not going to pay the people who already provided the insurance, already front of the money. that is not showing any discipline. that is just not meeting obligations. you cannot do that. that is not a credible way to run the government. we cannot going from crisis to crisis when there is a path in front of us that require stability and compromise. that's how this goes. that is how this needs to work. >> thank you, mr. president. binding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. in previous aspects of american history, president reagan, president h. w. bush, president clinton
yesterday talking about the debt limit, debt ceiling. he's talked about our economy. i think it's worth noting that since 1923, when the president was required to furnish a budget in a time deadline given for furnishing that budget, 90 years, 90 years the president is required by law to furnish a budget. since 1923 those, those ensuing 90 years, there were apparently 11 times when presidents have been unable to get the budget to congress as required by law. and most of those -- well, some of those 11, there were very good reasons. but it's interesting to note in the last 90 years, out of the 11 times that the budget from the president has been late, four of those 11 have been under the obama administration. we're also informed that there is a chance once again, like there was a year and a half ago, that our credit rating of the u.s. could be lowered again. by another credit rating agency. some have tried to paint it as a different story, different picture, but for those of us who recall what happened, s&p made it clear that they didn't believe that the united states was serious about de
and pushing us up against the debt ceiling. but remarkably, president obama is now calling for even more taxes, more spending, and more borrowing in return for any future spending controls. he said yesterday that we can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. simply put, the president got his tax increases in the last congress. it's time for this congress to tackle washington's spending bing. i'd like to recognize the gentlelady from indiana. >> mr. chairman, my message otoday is simple. on too many big items, congress has been kicking the can down the road for years. it's time to supply real leadership on the most pressing challenges we face. this is the only way we can restore trust in congress. we're fast approaching a dead end. the social security trust fund will be bankrupt in 20 years. medicare and medicaid are not on a sustainable path. it is wrong for us to make proppingses to the american people we know we cannot keep. ms. brooks: we must address the drivers of our debt, medicare, medicaid, an social security. not because these programs don't have merit and
the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salaries, and $1.5 ode to military contractors and other commitments. consider again that day on february 15 f that is the day we reach the limit, the country would not have enough money to pay the bond holders let alone anyone else, more over analysts have raced questions about whether the treasury would be able to reprogram the ought mated payment system to prioritize some payments over others. the role of governm
the debt ceiling or later on over the continuing resolution to? finance to? -- or the continuing resolution to finance the government? guest: i've only been here two years. i truly believe that when i ran and even more so now, we are a nation at risk. every american, regardless of political affiliation. so we have to reduce federal spending. this is the time right now. some of my colleagues were saying let's get through the fiscal cliff and the real fight is the continuing resolution or the real fight is the debt limit. i hear that and it goes on. host: where do you insist on spending cuts? is that the debt ceiling or the continuing resolution? guest: it is that every point. host: all of the above? guest: yes. when the president says he wants a balanced approach, i believe him. i was looking for the simpson- bowles model, fighting for least 2 to 1. i was hoping for 1 to 1. i was disappointed and deeply surprised we did not get that in this fiscal cliff. here i was as a republican, so often introduced on tv shows and news shows, "coming up, a republican who says we need higher revenues." an
know, i was thinking about it in a way that republicans threatening to use the debt ceiling relays everything and puts the perspective, i think, in the wrong place. i think it's a serious mistake for them to even think about that, and we were talking earlier about the articles this morning saying how dangerous it is to use the debt ceiling to essentially put the full faith and credit of this country in the real jeopardy so i am very concerned about the consequences from doing that or even threatening to do it immediately and, also, it really shifts the focus and instead of it being on the debt ceiling, including tax reform. >> host: okay. so tax reform doesn't happen in 2013. >> guest: it may not happen. >> host: may not happen. what's the impact of that? what's the implication? >> guest: i said all along it's important for us to look beyond the label tax reform. for example, we are urged early on tax reform to bring the rates down to 25% individual and corporate. without indicating how in the world you would do that, and some said, well, we can use the exemptions in the deductions
's in south carolina. and this headline in the aiken standard -- then, on the debt ceiling debate, the ways and means chairman has announced there will be hearings on this on january 22. they will be taking a look and that. also in the newspapers this morning, here's the "washington times with this headline -- " he will be our guest coming up, the top democrat on the ways and means committee in the house. later, we will talk to the chairman of the house judiciary committee, representative goodlatte, on the washington journal this morning as well. two members of congress. continuing with the debt ceiling, the financial times this morning reports -- on the nomination of chuck hagel, a former nebraskahe ka senator.m he won the support of two key members. his opposition so far has come almost entirely from fellow republicans. those are some of the headlines this morning in the papers. back to our question, do you support executive action on gun- control measures? now to an independent caller. caller: hi. i just wonder if there are any human beings left. the underlying issue has very little to d
. the way the republicans are threatening to use the debt ceiling delays everything and it puts the perspective in the wrong place. i think it is a serious mistake for them to even think about that. you were talking earlier about the articles this morning saying how dangerous it is to use the debt ceiling to essentially put the full faith and credit of this country in real jeopardy. so i'm very concerned about the consequences of doing that or even threatening to do it immediately and, also, it really shifts the focus, instead of it being on the debt ceiling, it should be elsewhere, including tax reform. host: if tax reform does not happen in 2013 -- guest: it may not happen. host: what is the impact of that? what is the implication? guest: i have said all along it is important for us to look beyond the label "tax reform." for example, we urged early on tax reform bringing the rates down to 25% individual and corporate, they -- without indicating how in the world they would do that. some said, we can use the exemptions and deductions. we have already begun to use them, i hope, i
intimating at this point that they're going to be some short-term extension in the debt ceiling and focus on spending. they seem -- you know, they seem to be a little bit hesitant to allow themselves to be set up again as people that are trying to destroy the economy. they're tired of being put in that position where they're holding back the economy. and i think it was the accusation in the first place, but they're sensitive to this point and they're going to roll over. >> they're very sensitive. the political realities of the situation is that i think we all know what needs to be done longer term. the reality is can they get any of this done in the next two months? and that's a much bigger question. i think they're trying to figure that out right now? >> well, we will have people that will argue that we don't have a spending problem, that president obama said we're going to have an economist on today on how you get -- you know, we're going to talk to him. he says the one thing that would hurt the economy is in cuts in social security or medicare or medicaid. any type of reform to those t
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)